What We Owe by Golnaz Hashemzadeh Bonde

To run the risk of using a tired cliché, this book is hauntingly beautiful. Nahid is an Iranian refugee living in Sweden, and she’s just been diagnosed with an advanced stage cancer. In this book, she looks back on her life as a wife and mother as she lives through her diagnosis and her daughter announces her own pregnancy.

Nahid narrates her own story. So while she is an unreliable narrator, she’s frank about her flaws in a non-judgemental way. She doesn’t care for being a mother, but she fiercely loves her daughter and does not feel guilty about this contradiction. She explains how she has become the woman that she is, and thinks about the life she lived.

I enjoy stories that complicate the narrative we’re told about refugees- it’s too easy to be reductivist about a group whose stories we think we know, when in fact we just know one small piece of their story. This book told an immigrant story, but more importantly it told a story of family, womanhood, motherhood, and legacy. The ending was exquisite, and tear-jerking. However, this book definitely has some trigger warnings- particularly for domestic violence.

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